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CMS 1500 Claim Form

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The increasing demand for healthcare and the increasing dependence on insurance for payment for services rendered has led to the creation of systems, which can ease the burden of the healthcare service provider. Increasing use of insurance by people means that the healthcare professional or provider has to maintain detailed information regarding the patient, his or her medical history, treatment and also the exact nature of the claim from the insurance company.

Insurance forms have undergone major changes over the years, with the major change coming in the form of electronic claims forms as opposed to the traditional paper claims. This change has ensured better accuracy, efficiency of filing as well as enhanced speed in reimbursing claims. Previously, healthcare service providers were using the HCFA 1500 form to process their claims. This has been rendered obsolete recently with the introduction of the new CMS 1500 claim form. Industry experts say this is a better version of the earlier form, and all the earlier loopholes are now plugged.

What is CMS 1500 Claim Form?

The CMS 1500 Claim Form is the standardized form used by non-institutional healthcare service providers who are seeking reimbursements from Medicare. It is pertinent to note that such healthcare providers are waived under the Administrative Simplification Compliance Act from being required to fill electronic claims. This form has been modified from the earlier version to include information regarding National Provider Identifier or NPI, which was not there in the earlier format.

These CMS 1500 claim forms are easily available at the US Government Printing Office, office supply stores and with local printing companies across the country. The CMS 1500 Claim forms are available in single part, multi part, laser, continuous feed, which make it easy for you to choose from, depending on the printer you have as well as your requirement.

Key points of CMS 1500 Claim Form
The CMS 1500 claim form is interpreted and computed by means of a technology known as the Intelligent Character recognition or ICR, which helps the computer to gather correct and exact information from the form. The advantages of this technology are:

  • Enhanced accuracy of data collation
  • Enhanced efficiency
  • Controlled manner of feeding data
  • Cost reduction

This software ensures that data is quickly captured from the claims forms and processed and verified against other data before final approval. However, it is important to remember that for the software to be accurate, the data in the forms should be accurate and legible.

Difference between CMS 1500 and HCFA 1500

Medicare forms have undergone tremendous changes over the years in order to ensure better efficiency and accuracy of information provided to the company. As mentioned above, most medical practitioners were using the HCFA 1500 claim form for many year. However, recently the government felt the need to change the existing form and create a new version; the CMS 1500 is projected to be superior of the earlier claim forms. Major changes included change in the language – either deleting or adding or modifying, and also change in the format of the boxes, including size, amongst other changes. The following changes can be called the major areas of change in the new CMS 1500 form:

  1. Inclusion of NPI Number or National Provider Identifier Number is perhaps the most important change that has happened in this form. The new form helps record the NPI number separately in a different box, unlike its predecessor, where everything was together, which often caused confusion.
  2. Removal of barcode from the header to allow space for noting the address of the payer
  3. The tag line “please do not staple in this area” was removed. Now you can attach your supplements at the top center of the claims forms.
  4. The field ‘type of service’ that was present in the earlier forms was removed in the new CMS 1500 as the companies felt that there was no need for such information. Instead the field is now called EMG.
  5. In the new CMS 1500 form, you will no longer see the words ‘reserved for local use’ as the same has been removed.
  6. The field ‘Tricare’ has been added above the field ‘Champus’ in the first box.
  7. Lastly, the website address from where form fillers can obtain the NUCC instruction manual is added in the new CMS 1500, thereby making it easy.

These changes, though relatively small, are significant. Therefore, it is important that you take care of it while filling in your forms.

Tips on filling CMS 1500 Accurately
Accuracy and exactness of information are very important when filling Medicare claim forms. Moreover, it is important to ensure that all fields are duly filled, in order to ensure completeness of the form. Given the novelty of the CMS 1500 and the multiplicity of fields, filling such a form can be quite daunting, especially to someone who is new to the field. The following tips will help you fill your CMS 1500 both successfully as well as accurately:

  • Always use fonts like Pica or Arial for filling these forms, with font size anywhere between 10 and 12.
  • Fill the form in capital letters and always use black ink or black colored font.
  • Never use italics, or broken characters, stylized fonts, dot matrix fonts or red ink while filling CMS 1500 forms.
  • Ensure that the data you enter is in the middle of the box and does not touch the edges.
  • Use standard codes for various fields and never use any narrative text.
  • Remember that the size of the form you submit is 8½” x 11″. So, make sure that you tear off all perforations. Additionally, it is important that you ensure that all other attachments to the form are smaller than the size of the form.
  • Never use stickers or rubber stamps with your name and address on the form.
  • Don’t fill any special characters like hyphens, ditto marks, periods, dollar signs etc on the form.
  • Ensure that you submit the form in original while keeping a photocopy for your reference. Any form not submitted in original will not be processed.

In addition to these formatting requirements, there are certain aspects of form filling, which must be considered if you want immediate and correct payment for your services. These include:

  • Ensure that all relevant fields are properly filled in the manner it should be filled.
  • Use appropriate codes to fill patient medical details. Details can be taken from the personal data of the patient that was collected during examination.
  • It is important to accurately enter fields like date of birth of patient, the health insurance number etc.
  • The names of both the insured as well as the patient should be entered correctly. Often it happens that the insured person is not the patient and in such cases, it is important to enter the name of the insured in the box earmarked for the same.
  • Section 11 of the CMS 1500 claim form is mandatory and must be filled as it determines whether the patient is covered under Medicare or not.
  • Lastly, ensure that the form is signed by the patient along with the date and once this is done, it can be submitted as per hospital rules and regulations.

Given the fact that many patients are covered under Medicare, it is important to ensure that each filing is given due care and time, in order to ensure accuracy of filing and immediacy of reimbursement. Following the simple tips given above will actually help in filing correct claims, which in turn will increase efficiency and ultimately increase profitability of the healthcare facility.

If you would like assistance with your Medical Office Billing, we will be happy to provide you with some suggestions. And you may wish to learn why an Outsourced Revenue Cycle Management company may be most appropriate for your medical office.

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Family Physician’s Guide To Electronic Medical Records Systems

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The new requirement for all physicians to use electronic medical records has challenged today’s Family Physicians, who already rely heavily on electronic data. This guide is intended to help you navigate this increasing complex area without losing site of your priority – patient care. From patient monitors and new patient surveys of medical history, to the sophisticated imaging and records systems your consultants use, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are paramount for delivering safe, high quality primary care. Failure of your Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) system is not an option, nor can you allow files to be lost or consultant records to be incompatible with the EMR you choose for your busy practice.

FAMILY MEDICINE-SPECIFIC EMR’S

The EMR System you choose needs to be able to integrate into your office setting. For example, if you do physical exams, EKG’s, and x-rays all in different rooms, you need your EMR to let you view updates to the patient record immediately, from any computer. Improved efficiency for your daily operations will help your office run more smoothly and with less interruptions, allowing your to spend more time with your patients and see more of them each day. The ideal EMR for you will depend on your specific office’s workflow, the equipment you and your consultants use, and the types of procedures and capabilities you plan to add to your practice as you grow. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that to allow for your next level of efficiency and capabilities, your ideal EMR will let you view all patient records from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

When you send your patients to a consultant, you frequently don’t get the benefit of viewing their ultrasounds, CT scans, or electrophysiological data to help you best interpret the test for your specific patient. As the patient’s primary physician, only you take the time to understand all of their circumstances and an EMR System that can let you see all the data that the specialists see will better equip you to do just that. The trouble is that, for example, many imaging centers and radiologists use different machines and software, so even if they send you a CD-ROM your computer can’t read it. This prolific problem is getting dramatically worse over time, as more and more technologies hit the market and you can’t predict which direction your consultants will choose. For example, if your favorite cardiologist uses iCardia Holter Monitors you may have no way of seeing the EKG tracings of your patient’s arrhythmias for yourself. If you figure out how to see the EKG tracings and then the cardiologist switches brands to Braemer you have to start all over again. Solving the endless technology challenges is not, we suspect, why you went to medical school.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

The last thing your EMR System should be is a burden to those that use it the most – your office personnel. Verify that your EMR will integrate automatic patient appointment reminders, preventive health maintenance protocols and other scheduling details unique to your practice. Mammograms, Pap smears, follow-up stress tests, and immunizations are a few issues that your new EMR System can address. This will ensure that no tests are forgotten and no one slips through the cracks on your busiest day, thereby improving compliance.

Special tests such as fasting oral glucose challenges often require that your staff spend time sending out reminders and tracking down results prior to their appointment with you. An EMR System that could integrate automatic emails or phone calls one week prior to an appointment would improve efficiency. Suffice is to say that many repetitive tasks can be integrated into an office system that curbs human error and improves your practice’s measurable outcomes.

DOCTORS OFFICE QUALITY – INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (DOQ-IT)

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services created the DOQ-IT program to encourage of adoption of EMRs and focuses on improved patient outcomes for small and medium-sized physician practices. Choosing an EMR that is compliant with DOQ-IT will provide effective billing practices, optimum pay-for-performance reporting, and improved patient outcomes.

DICOM COMPATIBILITY

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) is a standard construct used increasingly by Health Information Systems, but it is not universal. Specifically, DICOM covers handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical imaging. A popular imaging viewer is the PACS system, but it does not have the best interface for some media such as video loops of Doppler ultrasounds. You will want to make sure that the EMR you choose will allow you to view imaging from your own office and that from your consultants.

>EMR CONSULTANT

This has built a substantial case for using an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team. Call 888.519.3100 or visit www.EMRconsultant.com to speak with an expert that can help you make your investment wisely.

Family Medicine EMR Checklist

GENERAL FEATURES

  • The ability to have multiple complaints evaluated during each visit.
  • Family Practice templates for common conditions such as:
    • Respiratory: Sore Throat, Sinusitis, Pneumonia, Influenza
    • Musculoskeletal: Back Pain, Neck Pain, Joint Pain
    • Cardiovascular: Chest Pain, Palpitations, Hypertension
    • Immunization Tracking
    • Allergy: Rhinitis
    • Dermatologic: Rashes, Acne, Lesions
    • Gastrointestinal: Nausea, Vomiting, Diarrhea
  • A willingness to have the EMR Vendor assist with customization of Family Practice templates that match the templates you have been using:
    • Physical Exam templates
    • Growth Charts
    • Excuse Templates for School, Work
    • Various State Mandated Forms
    • Annual Check-up
    • Patient Education for Family Practice complaints
    • Health Maintenance Reminders
    • Multiple Lab Interfaces
    • Pediatric Dosage calculator

KEY BENEFITS

  • Increased productivity by
    • Immediate access to charts 24/7
    • Immediate access to dictated information
    • More rapid billing of encounters with diagnostic and treatment options
    • Improved utilization of office space
    • Better attention to alerts including abnormal lab results
    • Lower probability of medication errors
    • Diminished transcription costs
    • Lowered costs for paper and supplies
    • No costs for chart pulls
    • Lower staff expenses
    • May lower malpractice expenses
  • Improved medical care
    • Immediate access to medical information
    • Ability to use clinical practice guidelines to assist

INTEGRATION OF DATA FROM VITAL SIGN MACHINES

  • DRE Waveline
  • DRE ASM 6000v
  • DRE Trax Transport Monitor
  • DRI Vida Multi-Parameter
  • DRE Signal SP VSM
  • Tidalwave 715Sp
  • Respironics Novametrix
  • BCI Capnocheck Plus
  • Welch Allyn Atlas
  • BCI Mini-Torr Plus NIBP/O2
  • Mindray PM8000
  • DRE Axis 4 Portable
  • DRE Waveline EZ
  • Philips 863051 Model C1
  • Philips Intellivue MP40
  • Critikon Dinamap
  • Datex AS3
  • Philips M2636B Telemon

INTEGRATION OF EKG AND HOLTER MONITOR DATA

  • Marquette MAC Series
  • Nihon Koden EKG System
  • Philips Pagewrite EKG
  • Welch Allyn CP100
  • iCardia Event Monitoring Service
  • Braemer Event Monitors

INTEGRATION OF DOPPLER AND ECHOCARDIOGRAM DATA

  • Acuson Cypress
  • Acuson Sequoia
  • Unitixs Vascular Systems
  • Multilab Vascular Systems

INTEGRATION OF STRESS TEST AND TREADMILL DATA

  • GE Case
  • GE Marquette
  • GE Dinamap
  • GE DASH
  • GE CareScape
  • Philips Sure Signs
  • Welch Allyn Propaq
  • Spot Vital Signs

Emergency Physician’s Guide To Electronic Medical Records Systems

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Emergency Physician’s have relied on electronic medical records, in some form, for decades now. From stat laboratory data and patient locator software to integrated Zoll monitors that streamline the recording of codes, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are paramount for delivering high quality emergency care. The sophisticated technology is undermined, however, when power failures hit and communication channels are compromised. Fortunately, contingency programs can be integrated into Electronic Medical Records Systems (EMRs).

EMERGENCY MEDICINE-SPECIFIC EMRs

The EMR System you choose needs to interface with the various systems in place throughout the hospital. From the time a patient sees the Triage Nurse and is put into a room, an ideal system would have a single interface that integrates these data with the patient’s medical history, imaging, and patient records from regional hospitals. The dozens of small steps in the process of patient care in your unique Emergency Department should be able to seamlessly integrate into a user-friendly experience. For example, if you do physical exams, x-rays and ultrasounds all in different rooms, you need your EMR to be able to automatically migrate all of the patient’s data so that it is accessible from any computer. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that all patient records will be easily accessible from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

Many trauma transfers and referral patients bring CD-ROM’s and documentation from hospitals and physicians that use different machines and software than your hospital. Choosing an EMR based on the myriad of consultant’s and referral hospitals’ equipment is difficult at best. For example, if you use the Siemens AR Star CT Scanner, but an outside hospital transfers a trauma patient with CT images on a CD-ROM from a Toshiba Asteion ER004, you need to make sure that your department’s software will be able to read the disk. The days of needing a double-dose of IV contrast to repeat a CT scan because of incompatibility are nearing an end.

BUILDING TRUST IN YOUR EMR SYSTEM

In addition to software and equipment compatibility, the right EMR for your Emergency Department should make your workflow easier, not harder. Your daily operations and patient flow through the department should not have to adapt to accommodate an antiquated EMR. It should be the other way around.

In the event of a disaster, make sure you have contingency plans for power and communications failures. Investigate the EMR you’re considering thoroughly to determine if it has the ability perform data recovery and system backup. Be sure you have a system in place that you can trust to alert you to critical developments.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

Verify that your EMR will seamlessly integrate triage notes, ER visit history, previous elopements, as well as all past medical history. Automatic visual and/or auditory notification of critical laboratory tests and contraindications for medication administration will improve outcomes. From documenting triage decisions and patient contact times, to tracking which personnel log into the EMR, many repetitive tasks can be integrated into an EMR system that curbs human error and improves department efficiency.

DICOM COMPATIBILITY

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) is a standard construct used increasingly by Health Information Systems, but it is not universal. Specifically, DICOM covers handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical imaging.

Typically, different imaging systems and software are used to render different modalities, such as ultrasound, CT, and MRI. The danger of putting all imaging modalities in one viewing system is that it could fail. Therefore, redundancy and parallel backup systems are needed. Because you will view color video of Doppler ultrasounds along side plain x-rays and graphical data, the EMR System you choose will likely need to meet the DICOM standard with PACS compatibility.

The following pages will help you inventory your equipment and future purchases, in order to insure that all of the software is compatible with the EMR you choose. Frequently, manufacturers don’t publish their compatibility for the public, but require negotiation with a sales team. Intermediary, 3rd party EMR consultants can make this process much more bearable, ensuring that you invest your resources wisely.

EMR CONSULTANT

This has built a substantial case for using an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team. Call 888.519.3100 or visit www.EMRconsultant.com to speak with an expert that can help you make your investment wisely.

Emergency Department EMR/Suite Checklist

INTEGRATION OF DEFIBRILLATOR DATA

  • Philips Hearstart MRx & XLT
  • Philips Agilent and HP CodeMaster
  • Medtronic Lifepack 8, 8P, 12, 20
  • Physio Lifepack 5-11
  • Zoll PD1400, PD1200
  • Zoll M-Series
  • Zoll CCT M-Series
  • Zoll PD 2000 & PD 1600P
  • Nihon Kohden 8251A & 7200
  • Welch Allyn MRL PIC 50

INTEGRATION OF CRITICAL CARE MONITOR DATA

  • DRE Waveline
  • DRE ASM 6000
  • DRE Trax Transport Monitor
  • DRI Vida Multi-Parameter
  • DRE Signal SP VSM
  • Tidalwave 715Sp
  • Respironics Novametrix
  • BCI Capnocheck Plus
  • Welch Allyn Atlas
  • BCI Mini-Torr Plus NIBP/O2
  • Mindray PM8000
  • DRE Axis 4 Portable
  • DRE Waveline EZ
  • Philips 863051 Model C1
  • Philips Intellivue MP40
  • Critikon Dinamap
  • Datex AS3
  • Philips M2636B Telemon

COMPATABILITY OF CT SCANNERS

  • Siemens Volume Zoom Quad Slice CT Scanner
  • Siemens Emotion Duo CT Scanner
  • Siemens Somatom Emotion CT Scanner
  • Siemens AR Star CT Scanner
  • Siemens Plus 4 Power CT Scanner
  • GE LightSpeed 16 Pro CT or QXI/P
  • Toshiba Asteion ER004
  • Toshiba Aquilion 16-Slice
  • Siemens Biography Duo PET/CT
  • GE FX/I Single Slice MX 165 3.5 MHU Tube
  • GE Prospered Single Slice SW Version V06-04
  • Marconi Ultra-Z Single Slice
  • Philips MX8000IDT-16 Multislice

INTEGRATION OF DOPPLER AND ULTRASOUND DATA

  • Acuson Cypress
  • Acuson Sequoia
  • Unitixs Vascular Systems
  • Multilab Vascular Systems
  • Summit Doppler
  • Life Dop Doppler System

INTEGRATION OF EKG DATA

  • Marquette MAC Series
  • Nihon Koden EKG System
  • Philips Pagewrite EKG
  • Welch Allyn CP100

CHIEF COMPLAINT TEMPLATES BY ICD-9 CODE

  • 786.50 UNSPEC CHEST PAIN
  • 789.09 ABDOMINAL PAIN OTHER SITE
  • 465.9 ACUTE UPPER RESP INFECTIONS UNS
  • 847.2 SPRAIN/STRAIN LUMBAR REGION
  • 558.9 OTH NONINFECTIOUS GASTROENTERITIS
  • 486 PNEUMONIA ORGANISM UNS
  • 466.0 ACUTE BRONCHITIS
  • 780.99 OTHER GENERAL SYMPTOMS
  • 784.0 HEADACHE
  • 346.90 UNS MIGRAINE NOT INTRACT
  • 847.0 SPRAIN/STRAIN OF NECK
  • 079.99 UNSPECIFIED VIRAL INFECTION
  • 599.0 URINARY TRACT INFECTION UNSPEC
  • 724.2 LUMBAGO
  • 338.19 OTHER ACUTE PAIN
  • 780.2 SYNCOPE/COLLAPSE
  • 780.97 ALTERED MENTAL STATUS
  • 786.09 RESPIRATORY ABNORMALITY OT
  • 428.0 CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE UNSPEC
  • 787.03 VOMITING ALONE

Chiropractor’s Guide To Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) Systems

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Chiropractors are frequently leaders in implementing electronic records into their practices. From patient history and demographic data to x-rays and CT scan images, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are paramount for delivering high quality chiropractic care. The sophisticated technology is undermined, however, if each piece of the chiropractor’s arsenal isn’t integrated into a comprehensive Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) system.

CHIROPRACTIC SPECIFIC EMR’S

The Electronic Medical Record System you choose needs to be able to easily integrate into your office’s workflow. For example, if you do physical exams, x-rays, and other tests in different rooms, you need your EMR to automatically migrate all of the patient’s data so that it is accessible from any computer workstation. The days of manually scanning, uploading, and transferring patient data are over. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that all patient records will be easily accessible from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

You may be one of the many chiropractors that see patients that have had imaging from other specialists or are referred by a primary care physician. Of course, they may have had imaging at a facility that uses different machines and software than what you have in your office. Choosing an EMR that will interface with all of the technologies on the market is difficult at best and impossible at worst. For example, if you use the Chiropractic Digital DR Summit DXR to perform x-rays in your clinic, but a patient brings you a CD-ROM from an imaging center that uses MediaTech USA’s DDR MAK 2000, you may find that your Life Systems ChiroPad EMR software won’t let you view the images. You need to make sure that the EMR you choose to grow your practice will be compatible with what you will reasonably encounter in this booming technology age.

BUILDING TRUST IN YOUR EMR SYSTEM

The responsibility to wisely choose an EMR does not end with equipment compatibility. You want to make sure that the EMR you choose will make your life easier, not harder. The daily operations of your chiropractic office should not have to adapt to accommodate a rigid, antiquated EMR. It should be the other way around.

Patient records that have positive findings should automatically be flagged for you’re your attention and your EMR should seek to minimize human error by creating a network of checks and balances. For example, if a patient missed their last appointment and you wanted them to repeat x-rays in the interim, your EMR should trigger a combination of audible and visual notifications so that you don’t begin to manipulate them against your prior treatment plan. You should have all the facts before laying hands on your patients, even those you’ve known for a long time. You can do this more safely and consistently by implementing an EMR System that you can trust will alert you to critical developments.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

Your new EMR should be easy for office personnel to learn and use. You don’t want to choose something that will be a burden to those who use it the most. Verify that your EMR will seamlessly integrate patient appointments, reminders, and other scheduling details.

Special tests such as arterial and venous Doppler ultrasounds often require that your staff spend time sending out reminders and tracking down results prior to their appointment with you. An EMR System that could integrate automatic emails or phone calls one week prior to an appointment would improve efficiency.

DICOM COMPATIBILITY

Whether you intend to use a PACS system or not, the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is something you’ll need to consider as you evaluate EMR’s. DICOM is a standard construct used increasingly by Health Information Systems, but it is not ubiquitous. Specifically, DICOM covers handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical imaging.

Because you will want to view MRI’s, CT’s, plain radiographs and perhaps ultrasounds, the EMR System you choose will likely need to meet the DICOM standard. To ensure that all of the equipment and software you use can be accessed and viewed within your EMR interface, it will be important to navigate the technical areas of licensing fees versus free viewers and custom integration programming.

EMR CONSULTANT

Using an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team can be quite helpful in avoiding costly mistakes. Call 888.519.3100 to speak with an expert who can help you make your investment wisely.

Chiropractic EMR/Suite Checklist

Make sure that your Chiropractic EMR is compatible with the specific office equipment in your facility:

CHIROPRACTIC-SPECIFIC FEATURES

  • Chiropractic Examination Reports
  • Interface with Electronic Goniometers
  • Neck Disability Assessments
  • Patient information concerning home exercise programs.
  • Rand Assessments
  • Range of motion measures of the Spine and extremities flow charts
  • X-Ray Analysis

CHIROPRACTIC-SPECIFIC TEMPLATES

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Cervical Complaints
  • Chiropractic Narrative
  • Disc Bulge, Herniation or rupture
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Follow Up
  • Low Back Pain
  • Lumbar Complaints
  • Medicare Spinal Complaints
  • Motor Vehicle Accident
  • Neck Pain and Stiffness
  • Physical Exam
  • Sciatica
  • Scoliosis
  • Spinal Complaints
  • Sports Injury
  • Thoracic Complaints
  • Whiplash
  • Workers Compensation
  • X-Ray

INTEGRATION OF CHIROPRACTIC SOFTWARE DATA

  • Life Systems ChiroPad EMR and ChiroOffice
  • Software Motif Inc.’s MyEMR Chiropractic Suite
  • Acrendo Software
  • AMS Software
  • Chiropractic Complete MaxPro
  • ChiroSoft
  • Clacken Software: DC- PowerNotes
  • Creative Concepts in Communication: ClinicPro software
  • DataCom Software Business Products
  • DB Consultants
  • Doctors Computer System
  • E-Z Bis
  • EZnotes
  • Forté Systems
  • Genius Solutions
  • Handy Works
  • Herfert Chiropractic Software
  • InPhase Technologies Group: Practice management software
  • K&K Systems Corporation: Practice Made Perfect software
  • Lytec
  • MacEssentials: AccountMaster Chiropractic
  • MediNotes
  • MediSoft Patient Accounting
  • MicroFour
  • MPN Software Systems: Office-management systems
  • Pulse Software: ChiroPulse
  • Quick Notes
  • Satori Chiropractic Software
  • TGI Software
  • Versatile Software Systems

COMPATIBILITY OF X-RAY MACHINE DATA

  • Digital X-ray – Kodak Point-of-Care tower
  • Digital X-ray – ACL-04 41 plates per hour with complete viewing station and IBM ThinkCenter tower
  • Chiropractic DR 9MP CCD DR Retrofit system
  • Podiatry X-ray & CR System
  • Chiropractic Digital DR Summit DXR
  • MediaTech USA’s DDR MAK 800-2000

Anesthesiologist’s Guide To Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) Systems

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Many of today’s modern anesthesiologists have relied heavily on electronic patient records for quite some time. From medical histories during pre-op, to intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are paramount for delivering high quality anesthesiology care. The sophisticated technology is undermined, however, if the pieces of the anesthesiologist’s record systems aren’t integrated into a comprehensive Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system.

ANESTHESIOLOGY-SPECIFIC EMR’S

Unless you’re in a private anesthesiology group, you may not have much choice in the EMR System you use, but consider this. An EMR system designed by anesthesiologists will be more relevant to your daily workflow with much less after market modification than other systems. It would be ideal if you could find an EMR that would let you have a complete compliment of anesthesiology-specific content and integrate its data with the existing EMR software that you use in the hospitals where you hold privileges.

The EMR System that you choose needs to be able to allow for the particular way your practice operates and your daily workflow. For example, if you take preoperative patient histories using on hospital-based EMR system, but the anesthesiology-specific EMR suite that you want is different, you need your EMR to automatically migrate all of the patient’s data so that it is instantly accessible from your office, the operating room, or any other computer workstation. The days of manually scanning, uploading, and transferring patient data are over. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that all patient records will be easily accessible from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

Many surgeons send their patients for tests that use different machines and software than they the hospital has access to. Choosing an EMR based on the myriad of consultant’s equipment is difficult at best. For example, if cardiologists cleared a C.A.B.G. patient using the Welch Allyn Propaq Stress Testing System and you want to see the EKG tracings yourself, you need to make sure that the EMR you choose will let you grow your practice in all of these circumstances.

BUILDING TRUST IN YOUR EMR SYSTEM

In addition to software compatibility between all of the records systems that you access, the right EMR for your practice should make your life easier, not harder. The daily operations of your anesthesiology practice should not have to adapt to accommodate an antiquated EMR; it should be the other way around. For example, if a patient’s most recent intraoperative hematocrit drops by eight points, a combination of audible and visual notifications should be triggered. You shouldn’t have to manually check everything and lose precious time before replenishing blood products; rather you should have a system in place, which acts as an adjunct to your traditional methods of ensuring patient safety. Over time, you will build trust that your new EMR will alert you to critical developments.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

Don’t waste time learning complicated software systems that seem to drain more energy than you expect. Your new EMR should be convenient, easy to use, and save you time. If you have other personnel, such as secretaries or nurses that access your EMR, it should make their life easier too, not increase their burden. Verify that your EMR will seamlessly integrate patient appointments, reminders, and other scheduling details.

From ordering special materials and gases for inventory, to tracking who logs into the EMR, a lot of repetitive tasks can be integrated into your anesthesiology practice’s unique system. This will help curb human error and improve your practice’s measurable outcomes.

DICOM COMPATIBILITY

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) is a standard construct used increasingly by Health Information Systems, but it is not universal. Because you will view color video of Doppler ultrasounds, plain radiographs and graphical data, the EMR System you choose will likely need to meet this standard.

EMR CONSULTANT

This has built a substantial case for using an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team. Call 888.519.3100 or visit www.EMRconsultant.com to speak with an expert that can help you make your investment wisely.

Anesthesiology EMR/Suite Checklist

ANESTHESIOLOGY-SPECIFIC EMR

  • Ability to capture multiple codes simultaneously
  • Ability to interact with nursing, perfusion records and surgeon’s notes
  • Capture physiologic data from patient monitors or devices
  • Provide O.R. utilization data without user input
  • Time calculator

ANESTHESIOLOGY-SPECIFIC TEMPLATES

  • Cardiac Anesthesia
  • Obstetrical Anesthesia
  • Pediatric Anesthesia
  • Possible health complications (e.g. age)
  • Preoperative medicine
  • Side effects

COMPATIBILITY OF ANESTHESIA MACHINE DATA

  • Draeger Narkomed 2C & GS
  • Ohmeda Excel 210 + SE
  • Ohmeda Modulus SE
  • GE-Ohmeda Aestiva 5
  • Infinium Medical ADS II
  • Penion SP102
  • Biease STRATA
  • Fraser Harlake 50
  • Bickford 41110

INTEGRATION OF ANESTHESIA-SPECIFIC EMR’S

  • A.l. med 8.0
  • OmniMD Anesthesiology EMR
  • Ubiquity MD
  • Carolina EMR

INTEGRATION OF CRITICAL CARE MONITOR DATA

  • DRE Waveline
  • DRE ASM 6000
  • DRE Trax Transport Monitor
  • DRI Vida Multi-Parameter
  • DRE Signal SP VSM
  • Tidalwave 715Sp
  • Respironics Novametrix
  • BCI Capnocheck Plus
  • Welch Allyn Atlas
  • BCI Mini-Torr Plus NIBP/O2
  • Mindray PM8000
  • DRE Axis 4 Portable
  • DRE Waveline EZ
  • Philips 863051 Model C1
  • Philips Intellivue MP40
  • Critikon Dinamap
  • Datex AS3
  • Philips M2636B Telemon

INTEGRATION OF DOPPLER AND ECHOCARDIOGRAM DATA

  • Acuson Cypress
  • Acuson Sequoia
  • Unitixs Vascular Systems
  • Multilab Vascular Systems
  • Summit Doppler
  • Life Dop Doppler System

INTEGRATION OF EKG DATA

  • Marquette MAC Series
  • Nihon Koden EKG System
  • Philips Pagewrite EKG
  • Welch Allyn CP100
  • Zymed Digitrak

INTEGRATION OF STRESS TEST AND TREADMILL DATA

  • GE Case
  • GE Marquette
  • GE Dinamap
  • GE DASH
  • GE CareScape
  • Philips Sure Signs
  • Welch Allyn Propaq
  • Spot Vital Signs

Dermatologist’s Guide To Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) Systems

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The medical community has had quite a challenge to convert to entirely medical records and, in many ways, is still in transition. Dermatologists frequently enjoy straightforward practice settings that integrate patient data on surgical procedures, patients’ historical data, and newer technologies that continue to emerge. Any more, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are improving and high quality dermatology care is being increasingly streamlined. The sophisticated technology is undermined, however, if each piece of the dermatologist’s arsenal isn’t integrated into a comprehensive Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) system.

DERMATOLOGY SPECIFIC WORKFLOW

The term “workflow” refers here to an EMR that adapts to the way you conduct your office activities. Instead of being a cumbersome addition to your workload, the right EMR System for you can and should easily integrate into your unique office setting. For example, if you do physical exams, laser treatments and phlebotomy all in different rooms, you need your EMR to be able to automatically migrate all of the patient’s data so that it is accessible from any computer throughout your office. The days of manually scanning, uploading, and transferring patient data are over. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that all patient records will be easily accessible from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records. This includes drawings you use to identify the locations of lesions with respect to anatomy. As you will read in a moment, all of this information can be housed within one EMR System if you find an EMR specifically for Dermatologists.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

Many Dermatologists acquire new patients from a host of community referral locations, with physicians that use different machines and software than they own in their office. You need to be able to verify their previous imaging for the best possible patient care and to avoid repeating any tests, particularly for staging various cancers. The problem is that trying to choose an EMR based on the myriad of consultant’s equipment is difficult at best. For example, if you use the DicomWorks viewer for viewing radiographic images, but a patient brings you a CD-ROM from a consultant that used CT Scanner from Toshiba, the Aquilion 16-Slice, you need to make sure that the EMR you choose to grow your practice will be compatible.

If you consult on patients in the hospital or another setting separate from your primary office, the right EMR can really help increase your efficiency. First, being able to view the patient’s record remotely while your taking the consulting physician’s phone call can be extremely helpful. Second, you can synchronize the data on your laptop or handheld device directly into your EMR. Taking your laptop of portable digital assistant with you on your visit to the away patient can save you time by not having to type notes a second time after the consult is finished.

DRAWING DERMATOLOGIC IMAGES IN YOUR EMR

A growing trend is for physicians to use tablet PC’s at bedside. This lends itself very easily to using EMR’s that allow you to draw on anatomical diagrams directly in the patient’s record. Traditional desktop computers also allow this feature. For example, you can outline a nevus and the EMR Software will convert that to an image file that is saved with the patient record. This can be particularly useful when tracking growth. You will need to put specific notes in the text areas of the EMR for it to be searchable later.

BUILDING TRUST IN YOUR EMR SYSTEM

Dermatologists are known to conduct rather extensive excisions of carcinomas in the clinic setting. Your EMR should record vital signs in real time and trigger audible and visual notifications in the event of abnormal readings. You shouldn’t have to watch the monitor continually; rather you can control all the parameters and alarms exactly how you want them to behave.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

Appointment reminders and recurring laboratory studies frequently require valuable time from your staff. An EMR System that could integrate automatic emails or phone calls one week prior to an appointment would improve efficiency.

In addition, your EMR should timestamp and track every authorized user’s activities. From ordering special materials prior to nuclear studies, to tracking who logs into the EMR, a lot of repetitive tasks can be integrated into an office system that curbs human error and improves your practice’s measurable outcomes.

EMR CONSULTANT

This has built a substantial case for using an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team. Call 888.519.3100 or visit www.EMRconsultant.com to speak with an expert that can help you make your investment wisely.

Dermatology EMR/Suite Checklist

DERMATOLOGY-SPECIFIC EMR/EHR FEATURES:

  • Ability to bill for multiple lesion treatment at one visit
  • Ability to fully analyze dermatological lesions, with the ability to describe them in detail, including graphically:
    • Lesions
    • Rashes
    • Ulcers
  • Dermatologic operations, including indications
  • Dermatopathology Report Import/Interface
  • Evaluation of MOH’s procedure
  • Graphics of each area of the body upon which to draw lesions

DERMATOLOGY-SPECIFIC EMR/EHR TEMPLATES:

  • Ablinism
  • Acne
  • Actinic Keratosis
  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Boils
  • Burn
  • CAD
  • Cellulitiesv
  • Contact Dermatitis
  • Cryosurgery, Shave Biopsy/Removal
  • Diabetes Mllitus
  • Drug Eruption
  • Dyslipidemia
  • Eczema
  • Folliculities
  • Griscelli Syndome
  • Hair Loss
  • Herpes
  • Impetigo
  • Insect Bites
  • Laceration/Contusion
  • Lupus
  • Mole Changes
  • Parathyroid Disorder
  • Psoriasis
  • Rash
  • Rosacea
  • Seborrheic Dermatitis
  • Skin Cancer Screening
  • Suture Removal
  • Tinea Versicolor
  • Urticaria
  • Varicose Veins
  • Warts
  • Wrinkles
  • Xerosis

DERMATOLOGY-SPECIFIC PROCEDURES

  • Accutane
  • Acne Surgery
  • Alpha Hydroxyacids for Sun Damage
  • Antibiotic Treatment
  • Daily Face Care
  • Daily Foot Care
  • Daily Skin and Scalp Care
  • Dermabrasion
  • Injections
  • Laser Hair Removal
  • Liquid Nitrogen Treatment
  • Poison Ivy Treatment
  • Propecia Therapy
  • Skin Care Consult
  • Wart Treatment

INTEGRATION OF DATA FROM VITAL SIGN MACHINES

  • DRE Waveline
  • DRE ASM 6000
  • DRE Trax Transport Monitor
  • DRI Vida Multi-Parameter
  • DRE Signal SP VSM
  • Tidalwave 715Sp
  • Respironics Novametrix
  • BCI Capnocheck Plus
  • Welch Allyn Atlas
  • BCI Mini-Torr Plus NIBP/O2
  • Mindray PM8000
  • DRE Axis 4 Portable
  • DRE Waveline EZ
  • Philips 863051 Model C1
  • Philips Intellivue MP40
  • Critikon Dinamap
  • Datex AS3
  • Philips M2636B Telemon

Cardiologists Guide To Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) Systems

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Today’s cardiologists rely heavily on electronic data from a variety of sources. From echocardiogram and stress test machines to catheterization suites, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are paramount for delivering high quality cardiology care. The sophisticated technology is undermined, however, if each piece of the cardiologist’s arsenal isn’t integrated into a comprehensive Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) system.

CARDIOLOGY-SPECIFIC EMR’S

The EMR System you choose needs to be able to integrate into your office setting. For example, if you do physical exams, echocardiograms and stress testing all in different rooms, you need your EMR to be able to automatically migrate all of the patient’s data so that it is accessible from any computer. The days of manually scanning, uploading, and transferring patient data are over. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that all patient records will be easily accessible from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

Many cardiologists send their patients for tests that use different machines and software than they own in their office. Choosing an EMR based on the myriad of consultant’s equipment is difficult at best. For example, if you use the GE Marquette Stress Testing System in your office, but a patient brings you a CD-ROM from a consultant that used iCardia Event Monitoring as a Holter device, you need to make sure that the EMR you choose to grow your practice will be compatible.

BUILDING TRUST IN YOUR EMR SYSTEM

Besides equipment compatibility, the right EMR for your office should make your life easier, not harder. The daily operations of your cardiology practice should not have to adapt to accommodate an antiquated EMR. It should be the other way around. For example, if a patient is in your Philips Integris Cath Lab suite and their latest potassium result is 7.4, a combination of audible and visual notifications should be triggered. You shouldn’t have to wait in the Emergency Department to receive all of your laboratory results before taking the patient to the cath lab; rather you should have a system in place that you can trust will alert you to critical developments.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

The last thing your sophisticated cardiology suite and EMR System should do is be a burden to those that use it the most – your office personnel. Verify that your EMR will seamlessly integrate patient appointments, reminders, and other scheduling details. Special tests such as fasting lipid profiles often require that your staff spend time sending out reminders and tracking down results prior to their appointment with you. An EMR System that could integrate automatic emails or phone calls one week prior to an appointment would improve efficiency. From ordering special materials prior to nuclear studies, to tracking who logs into the EMR, a lot of repetitive tasks can be integrated into an office system that curbs human error and improves your practice’s measurable outcomes.

DICOM COMPATIBILITY

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) is a standard construct used increasingly by Health Information Systems, but it is not universal. Because you will view color video of echocardiograms, roentgenograms, and graphical data, the EMR System you choose will likely need to meet this standard.

Specifically, DICOM covers handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical imaging. To ensure that all of the equipment and software you use can be accessed and viewed within your EMR interface, it will be important to navigate the technical areas of licensing fees versus free viewers and custom integration programming.

EMR CONSULTANT

Using an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team can help avoid mistakes in this complicated field. Call 888.519.3100 or visit www.EMRconsultant.com to speak with an expert that can help you make your investment wisely.

Cardiology EMR/Suite Checklist

CARDIOVASCULAR DATA ANALYSIS

  • Analysis of Percent of Stenosis of Vessels
  • Cardiac Output Values
  • Cardiovascular Stress Tests
  • Cholesterol Lipid Analysis
  • Coumadin Flow Sheets
  • Ejection Fraction Values
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Integration of Hemodynamic data

INTEGRATION OF CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION DATA

  • GE LC 2000 Plus Digital
  • Philips Allura 2002 Bi-Plane
  • Philips Integris H-3000
  • Philips Integris V-3000
  • Siemens Hicor
  • Siemens Coroskop C
  • Drager Medical’s Infinity
  • MEDRAD, Inc.’s Veris MR
  • Mennen Medical Corp.’s Envoy
  • Philip’s IntelliVue Information Center

INTEGRATION OF DOPPLER AND ECHOCARDIOGRAM DATA

  • Acuson Cypress
  • Acuson Sequoia
  • Unitixs Vascular Systems
  • Multilab Vascular Systems
  • Summit Doppler
  • Life Dop Doppler System

INTEGRATION OF EKG AND HOLTER MONITOR DATA

  • Marquette MAC Series
  • Nihon Koden EKG System
  • Philips Pagewrite EKG
  • Welch Allyn CP100
  • iCardia Event Monitoring Servicev
  • Braemer Event Monitors
  • GEMS Life Event Monitoring Service
  • iRhythm Zio Event Card and Holters
  • GE Seer
  • Zymed Digitrak

INTEGRATION OF STRESS TEST AND TREADMILL DATA

  • GE Case
  • GE Marquette
  • GE Dinamap
  • GE DASH
  • GE CareScape
  • Philips Sure Signs
  • Welch Allyn Propaq
  • Spot Vital Signs

INTEGRATION OF ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY DATA

  • Bard Labsystem Pro EP Recording System
  • EP Link H.I.S. Interface
  • EP Loxix Mapping and Analysis Suite
  • Mega’s Micromed SD MRI-compatible EP Recording System
  • GE’s Cardiolab EP Recording System
  • Philips’ Biosense Webster Integration (EP Med Systems for EP Recording, plus XPER x-ray mapping)

INTEGRATION OF PACEMAKER DATA

  • Biotronik Cylos & Philos DR-T
  • CCC Pacemaker
  • Biotronik Argos, Teros & Apex series
  • Sorin Group (SG) REPLY DR
  • SG Symphony DR 2550
  • SG Rhapsody DR 2530 & DR 2510
  • Boston Scientific (Guidant Medical) ALTRUA Pacemaker Family
  • Medico Pacemakers’ Easy, Ejection, Sophos, Millennium, & Lindos
  • Medtronic Adapta & EnRhythm
  • St. Jude Affinity, Entity, Identity (incl. ADx), Integrity (incl. ADx), Microny, Regency, Verity ADx, Victory, & Zephyr
  • Shree Pacetronix’s Ventralite, Pinnacle, & Charak
  • Vitatron T-Series
  • Vitatron C-Series, A3 models (incl. 2nd generation)
  • Vitatron CRT 8000
  • Vitatron Selection 9000 AF3.0
  • Vitatron PreventAF, DiagnoseAF, Diamond 3, Ruby 3, Saphir 3, Topaz 3, Jade 3

CARDIOLOGY EMR TEMPLATES

  • Abnormal ECG
  • Abnormal Stress Tests
  • Acute Myocardial Infarction
  • Adenosine Nuclear Stress Test
  • Angina Pectoris
  • Aortic Disease
  • Cardiac Cath
  • Cardiac Exam
  • Cartoid Artery Stenosis
  • Chest Discomfort
  • Chest Pain
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Echocardiogram
  • Hemodynamic Studies
  • Hypertension
  • Pacemaker
  • Palpitations
  • Parathyroid Disorder

HEART DISEASE TEMPLATES

  • Adult Congenital Heart Disease
  • Angina Pectoris
  • Arrhythmia
  • Bradycardia
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Valvular Heart Disease

CARDIAC PROCEDURE DOCUMENTATION

  • AngioJet
  • Angioplasty
  • Atherectomy
  • Balloon Valvuloplasty
  • Intracoronary Radiation Therapy
  • Laser
  • Myocardial Biopsy
  • Stent Implantation
  • Heart Assist Device Implantation:
  • Intra-aortic Balloon Pump (IABP)
  • Ventricular Assist Device (VAD)

HEART PACING DEVICE IMPLANTATION

  • Automatic Implantable (or Internal) Cardioverter/ Defibrillator
  • Pacemakers

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Allergy Specialist’s Guide To Electronic Medical Records ( EMR ) Systems

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Today’s Allergists have relied heavily on electronic health records for quite some time. From complete sets of medical records to advanced spirometry machines, the accuracy and reliability of these data systems are paramount for delivering high quality patient care. The sophisticated technology is undermined, however, if some pieces of the allergist’s arsenal aren’t integrated into a comprehensive Electronic Medical Record ( EMR ) system

THE ALLERGIST’S EMR

The EMR needs of allergists vary widely. To choose the extent to which you want all of your data incorporated into one system will depend on how the EMR System will integrate into your office setting. For example, when you do physical exams, spirometry and observation each in a different room, you need your EMR to be able to automatically migrate all of the patient’s data so that it is accessible from any computer station. While it may at first appear simple to choose an EMR that will work in your particular practice, there are several considerations for the growth plan for your practice and overall strategy of workplace efficiency. Therefore, we will begin here with the assumption that all patient records will be easily accessible from one user interface, not multiple software programs for different types of records.

VERIFY EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY

You likely care for patients that have had outside tests performed, and have felt the frustration of having results that
you can’t view yourself because of software or equipment incompatibility. It isn’t enough to read a colleague’s opinion
about the test interpretation. The test results will either be devalued or the entire test will be repeated. For example, if
you use Quest Medical’s Astra 300 for computerized spirometry data and patients are referred to you with a CD-ROM
that has test results from a Puritan Bennett Renaissance II PB700, you need to make sure that the EMR you choose
to grow your practice will be compatible. There are such a tremendous number of issues of this nature, that checking
for compatibility between your existing system, your anticipated system, as well as the EHR and other healthcare
technology systems in use by your colleagues is a critically important issue in choosing your own EHR/EMR.

BUILDING TRUST IN YOUR EMR SYSTEM

The daily operations of your practice should not have to adapt to accommodate an antiquated or poorly
designed EMR. Nor should they be modified to suit a system designed for a different specialty. Using an EMR that is
appropriate for Allergists is critical, or you will find yourself scrapping the system, after tremendous costs and efforts
have been expended. In fact, it should be the other way around. For example, critical blood gas results should trigger
a combination of audible and visual notifications ensuring that you and your staff are kept updated on a moment-bymoment basis when giving breathing treatments. The ideal goal is to have a system in place that you can trust will
alert you to important events and results that affect your patients and your practice as a whole.

EASILY TRACK STAFF AND PATIENTS’ ACTIVITIES

Once you’ve fully implemented your new EMR, your office life should be easier, not harder. The last thing your
sophisticated allergist’s suite and EMR System should be is a burden to you and your office personnel. Verify that
the EMR you’re considering will seamlessly integrate patient appointments, reminders, and other scheduling
details.

Special tests such as periodic RAST assays may require that your staff spend time sending out reminders and
tracking down results prior to an appointment with you. An EMR System that integrates emails or phone calls one
week prior to an appointment would improve efficiency and decrease the workload of personnel in your practice.

The options you have available to you for EMR’s are vast. In addition, you can have them optimized and programmed
specifically for your practice. From ordering special materials prior to food allergy testing to checking who logged into
the EMR, a lot of repetitive tasks can be integrated into an office system and monitored. This will mitigate human
error and improves your practice’s measurable outcomes. This will materially increase the opportunity for you to
receive federal funding for using an EHR in a meaningful fashion.

DICOM COMPATIBILITY

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine ( DICOM ) is a standard construct used increasingly by Health
Information Systems
, but it is not universal. Because you frequently view plain radiographs, and may want to
view high resolution CT images alongside graphical data, the EMR System you choose will likely need to meet this
standard.

PACS is only one example of a viewer of patient imaging, but it is not the only one. To ensure that all of the
equipment and software you use can be accessed and viewed within your EMR interface, it will be important to
navigate the technical areas of licensing fees versus free viewers and custom integration programming.

EMR CONSULTANT

You may want to use an experienced EMR consultant without the financial bias of a corporate sales team. Call
888.519.3100 or visit EMR consultant to speak with an expert who can help you make your investment wisely.

Single Specialty vs. Multi-Specialty EMR

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By Eric Fishman, MD
President
EMRConsultant.com
info@emrconsultant.com

There is a lot of discussion concerning which is the “best” Electronic Health Record
(EHR) for any individual entity. There are a variety of parameters which should be
considered prior to embarking upon what will undoubtedly be one of the most important
decisions in the life of a healthcare organization.

One of the most important issues is “Should I purchase an EHR designed for my
specific specialty?”
We will attempt to address some of the pros and cons of each
option.

If you are involved in a multi-specialty clinic I would strongly advise against purchasing
multiple different EMRs, one for each specialty. One of the major difficulties with this
plan, and it may be all but insurmountable, is the inter-connectivity between the various
programs. Yes, they may all be HL7 compatible, but you will find yourself in an almost
endless quagmire of interfaces.

The question is a bit more difficult to answer if you practice in a single specialty
environment. There are a large number of specialty specific EMRs for a variety of
specialists, including Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, Cardiology,
etc. In
this instance, if you have a very sophisticated workflow, often seen in larger single
specialty medical groups, then a specialty specific EMR may be most appropriate.

I find that Oncologists, in particular, do well with EMRs designed specifically for their
specialty. This is, in part, because many of their workflow issues are entirely foreign to
almost all other specialties. This would include, of course, dosing issues concerning
their cancer treating pharmaceuticals.

At the other end of the spectrum would be Internal Medicine and/or Family Practice.
Most “general” EHRs are fully capable of handling most of the workflow and reporting
issues found in those practices, and therefore a more general Electronic Health Record
program would be most appropriate.

Cardiology, Ophthalmology and Orthopedics, and many others, fall somewhere in the
middle. If you find yourself using a substantial number of activities that are not
performed by any other specialists, such as in office arthroscopy for Orthopedists, you’ll
likely find generic EHRs to be lacking in functionality. If, however, your office based
practice is more standardized, by which I mean closer to the activities performed by
other specialists, then the problems which may be associated with single specialty
EHRs may not be worth encountering.

What are some of these problems? First of all, many single specialty EHRs are provided
by companies which are both small and unlikely to grow much larger because of their
limited potential user base. Certainly this is not the case of all single specialty EHRs,
and there are some multi-billion dollar companies producing fine software in this arena.
However, many of them are products which were started by a physician in that specialty.
Their longevity in the marketplace must be considered when acquiring software of that
nature.

So, in short summary, I would encourage you to take a careful look at the workflow in
your office and consider how similar or different it is to other physicians of different
specialties. If it is not extraordinarily different, I would go with a more general EHR. If, on
the other hand your specific installation is that of a multi-specialty clinic, I would strongly
recommend purchasing a general EHR from a company which is large enough to have
developed the different workflows for each relevant specialty.

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